The Strand Theater in Schroon Lake is wrapping up the summer season. They’re sending things off with vintage move night tonight. 
The art deco design of the theater is transporting, says Liz McNamara, owner of the Strand alongside her husband, Larry. The building itself is about 100 years old and was completely renovated in the 1930s.
“It’s a single screen theater,” said McNamara. “We have about 260 leather seats in the old style. There’s still coverings for sound dampening on the walls and on the ceiling. It’s all sorts of warm earth tones and matching rugs.”
Monica SandreczkiIt’s vintage movie night in Schroon Lake!

The Strand Theater. Photo by Dan Burkholder.

The Strand Theater. Photo by Dan Burkholder.

“It’s really a perfect spot for some of the movies of the late 30s and early 40s.”
They’re showing the archetype for film noir, The Maltese Falcon. It features actress Mary Astor is the original femme fatale and Humphrey Bogart in one of his earliest roles as the cold-hearted detective.
“I watch anything with Humphrey Bogart!” said McNamara. “Both Larry and I, we’ve never seen the real movie all the way through on the big screen. Our audience, in some ways [is] like us: awestruck when you see the real movie on the big screen from a time well before we would have seen it originally released. It’s just feels like a completely different movie!” 

Humphrey Bogart.

Humphrey Bogart.

To accompany the film, they’re bringing in film critic Jeremy Arnold, with Turner Classic Movies. His family has summered in Lake Placid for about 90 years. He says The Maltese Falcon was a pivotal film.
It was the directorial debut of John Huston, an acting debut for Sydney Greenstreet and his filming companionship with Peter Lorre. It also solidified Bogart in that cold-hearted detective persona. Before this, he was often cast in gangster parts. 
“People are quoting lines for even in response to our Facebook posts,” said McNamara. 
The film was made in 1941 as America was about to head into WWII.
“It just made American society a little more cynical. Suddenly, the world wasn’t such a safe place. Suddenly, there was danger. Suddenly, you know, we were dying. It just created a different mindset. Film noir really tapped into that,” said Arnold.
Arnold has written several books on essential classic films and has presented on a few of them at the Strand, including Casablanca and Singin’ in the Rain
“My fondest hope is that for people who maybe don’t see a lot of classic films from the 30s, 40s, and 50s, if they come out to this and get a taste of what a beautifully entertaining world this world of classic film is, that they’ll be inspired to go out and see more,” said Arnold.

The Strand Theater. Photo by Dan Burkholder.

The Strand Theater. Photo by Dan Burkholder.

source

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.